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Help Flex is Kings put the finishing touches on their film!

Flex is Kings, the long-awaited documentary about very under-recognizes Flex dancers (by our friends Deirdre and Mike), is headed to Tribeca Film Festival in April. Help the filmmakers defray the costs of the finishing touches for the film including color correction and sound mixing. They’ve got 10 more days to reach their goal of $20K

98% to Kickstarter Goal!

Let’s finish this campaign off!!!

NYC! Get in on this! Get your ticket with a $30 donation on Kickstarter! 
daftpunkhalloween:

It’s happening! If you’re in NYC, c’mon out and celebrate Halloween with us! We’ve got LEDs, robots, DJs, drinks, crazy costumes, dancing, dancing, dancing and more. It’s all going down on Saturday, October 27th at Windmill Studios in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. 
How here’s the important part.
To buy a ticket: make a $30 donation on Kickstarter.
Or, round up a few friends and get 4 tickets for $100 donation. But, if you get your tickets BEFORE 9:00 a.m. on October 11th — that’s next Thursday — you help US reach our campaign goal. 
Also, tickets at the door will be $40. 
So do it! We’re about 50% funded with 6 days to go. Get your ticket + help us out all in one swing. 

NYC! Get in on this! Get your ticket with a $30 donation on Kickstarter

daftpunkhalloween:

It’s happening! If you’re in NYC, c’mon out and celebrate Halloween with us! We’ve got LEDs, robots, DJs, drinks, crazy costumes, dancing, dancing, dancing and more. It’s all going down on Saturday, October 27th at Windmill Studios in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. 

How here’s the important part.

To buy a ticket: make a $30 donation on Kickstarter.

Or, round up a few friends and get 4 tickets for $100 donation. But, if you get your tickets BEFORE 9:00 a.m. on October 11th — that’s next Thursday — you help US reach our campaign goal. 

Also, tickets at the door will be $40. 

So do it! We’re about 50% funded with 6 days to go. Get your ticket + help us out all in one swing. 

daftpunkhalloween:

15 more days to go on our Kickstarter campaign (and just over a month till Halloween!). We’re busy decking out our float, building out costumes, holding dance auditions and planning our big Halloween party. But we still need your help to get to the $10K mark in the next 2 weeks! LET’S DO THIS. 
Check out the insanely awesome rewards that you can get from backing our project above. 

daftpunkhalloween:

15 more days to go on our Kickstarter campaign (and just over a month till Halloween!). We’re busy decking out our float, building out costumes, holding dance auditions and planning our big Halloween party. But we still need your help to get to the $10K mark in the next 2 weeks! LET’S DO THIS

Check out the insanely awesome rewards that you can get from backing our project above. 

John Doyle + the crew that produced Girl Walk // All Day are back with DAFT PUNK HALLOWEEN! We just launched our Kickstarter campaign this morning, and hope that YOU will join us to dance on our NYC Halloween Parade float + come out to our epic Halloween Party. Any support is greatly appreciated! 
John Doyle (aka The Creep) will be choreographing the dance routine that’ll take place on the float and be performed at the party. There will be auditions for spots on the float at the end of September in NYC. Stay tuned! 
daftpunkhalloween:

Kickstarter begins! We’re trying to raise $10,000 over the next 30 days to bring our Daft Punk Halloween Tribute Float + Parade to life. 
Rewards include: lenticular postcards, a 2013 Halloween countdown calendar, a signature dance move made just for you, tickets to our Halloween party, your very own Slag Hammer or Disco Face helmet, and more! 
We’d love your help spreading the word! Share our campaign: 
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/221718076/daft-punk-halloween-tribute
And you can follow along with our progress at Kickstarter, on Twitter, Instagram or here on this blog. 

John Doyle + the crew that produced Girl Walk // All Day are back with DAFT PUNK HALLOWEEN! We just launched our Kickstarter campaign this morning, and hope that YOU will join us to dance on our NYC Halloween Parade float + come out to our epic Halloween Party. Any support is greatly appreciated

John Doyle (aka The Creep) will be choreographing the dance routine that’ll take place on the float and be performed at the party. There will be auditions for spots on the float at the end of September in NYC. Stay tuned! 

daftpunkhalloween:

Kickstarter begins! We’re trying to raise $10,000 over the next 30 days to bring our Daft Punk Halloween Tribute Float + Parade to life. 

Rewards include: lenticular postcards, a 2013 Halloween countdown calendar, a signature dance move made just for you, tickets to our Halloween party, your very own Slag Hammer or Disco Face helmet, and more! 

We’d love your help spreading the word! Share our campaign: 

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/221718076/daft-punk-halloween-tribute

And you can follow along with our progress at Kickstarter, on Twitter, Instagram or here on this blog. 

At the 3 minute mark of Chapter 11 of Girl Walk, you see a young man start to glide his way across a crosswalk in Chinatown. He’s one of five Flex dancers we had the good fortune to film dancing on a glorious afternoon on our final day of shooting last October. Flexing is a relatively new dance style (born in about the year 2000) full of theatrics, street narrative, incredibly innovative usage of props, humor, collaboration, insane flexibility and strength, and gets its roots from reggae and other Caribbean dance forms. Most, if not all of the dancers we filmed, live in East New York, Brooklyn, and many come from tough neighborhoods where dance is a major outlet for fun, creative expression and keeping them out of trouble. 
Recently, we learned about Flex is Kings, a new documentary being made about these Flexers by filmmakers Diedre Schoo and Mike Nichols. They’ve shot 275 hours of footage of these guys (and occasional gals) dancing, battling, on the streets, at home and all over the city of New York. 
Last night, most of team Girl Walk got to attend a dance demo/battle at the Bond Street Theater, where 15 of Brooklyn’s best Flexers came out to break down what flexing really is, and show off some of the movements and routines that make this style of dance so incredible. We learned about connecting, pausing, bonebreaking, gliding, punchlines and the many components that make up the vocabulary of movement and theater. It was a fabulous night and we can’t wait to see these guys dance again. 
Support Flex is Kings on Kickstarter and help them finish shooting, editing and with post-production on this film! Above are some iphone snaps from last night’s event. At the 3 minute mark of Chapter 11 of Girl Walk, you see a young man start to glide his way across a crosswalk in Chinatown. He’s one of five Flex dancers we had the good fortune to film dancing on a glorious afternoon on our final day of shooting last October. Flexing is a relatively new dance style (born in about the year 2000) full of theatrics, street narrative, incredibly innovative usage of props, humor, collaboration, insane flexibility and strength, and gets its roots from reggae and other Caribbean dance forms. Most, if not all of the dancers we filmed, live in East New York, Brooklyn, and many come from tough neighborhoods where dance is a major outlet for fun, creative expression and keeping them out of trouble. 
Recently, we learned about Flex is Kings, a new documentary being made about these Flexers by filmmakers Diedre Schoo and Mike Nichols. They’ve shot 275 hours of footage of these guys (and occasional gals) dancing, battling, on the streets, at home and all over the city of New York. 
Last night, most of team Girl Walk got to attend a dance demo/battle at the Bond Street Theater, where 15 of Brooklyn’s best Flexers came out to break down what flexing really is, and show off some of the movements and routines that make this style of dance so incredible. We learned about connecting, pausing, bonebreaking, gliding, punchlines and the many components that make up the vocabulary of movement and theater. It was a fabulous night and we can’t wait to see these guys dance again. 
Support Flex is Kings on Kickstarter and help them finish shooting, editing and with post-production on this film! Above are some iphone snaps from last night’s event. At the 3 minute mark of Chapter 11 of Girl Walk, you see a young man start to glide his way across a crosswalk in Chinatown. He’s one of five Flex dancers we had the good fortune to film dancing on a glorious afternoon on our final day of shooting last October. Flexing is a relatively new dance style (born in about the year 2000) full of theatrics, street narrative, incredibly innovative usage of props, humor, collaboration, insane flexibility and strength, and gets its roots from reggae and other Caribbean dance forms. Most, if not all of the dancers we filmed, live in East New York, Brooklyn, and many come from tough neighborhoods where dance is a major outlet for fun, creative expression and keeping them out of trouble. 
Recently, we learned about Flex is Kings, a new documentary being made about these Flexers by filmmakers Diedre Schoo and Mike Nichols. They’ve shot 275 hours of footage of these guys (and occasional gals) dancing, battling, on the streets, at home and all over the city of New York. 
Last night, most of team Girl Walk got to attend a dance demo/battle at the Bond Street Theater, where 15 of Brooklyn’s best Flexers came out to break down what flexing really is, and show off some of the movements and routines that make this style of dance so incredible. We learned about connecting, pausing, bonebreaking, gliding, punchlines and the many components that make up the vocabulary of movement and theater. It was a fabulous night and we can’t wait to see these guys dance again. 
Support Flex is Kings on Kickstarter and help them finish shooting, editing and with post-production on this film! Above are some iphone snaps from last night’s event. At the 3 minute mark of Chapter 11 of Girl Walk, you see a young man start to glide his way across a crosswalk in Chinatown. He’s one of five Flex dancers we had the good fortune to film dancing on a glorious afternoon on our final day of shooting last October. Flexing is a relatively new dance style (born in about the year 2000) full of theatrics, street narrative, incredibly innovative usage of props, humor, collaboration, insane flexibility and strength, and gets its roots from reggae and other Caribbean dance forms. Most, if not all of the dancers we filmed, live in East New York, Brooklyn, and many come from tough neighborhoods where dance is a major outlet for fun, creative expression and keeping them out of trouble. 
Recently, we learned about Flex is Kings, a new documentary being made about these Flexers by filmmakers Diedre Schoo and Mike Nichols. They’ve shot 275 hours of footage of these guys (and occasional gals) dancing, battling, on the streets, at home and all over the city of New York. 
Last night, most of team Girl Walk got to attend a dance demo/battle at the Bond Street Theater, where 15 of Brooklyn’s best Flexers came out to break down what flexing really is, and show off some of the movements and routines that make this style of dance so incredible. We learned about connecting, pausing, bonebreaking, gliding, punchlines and the many components that make up the vocabulary of movement and theater. It was a fabulous night and we can’t wait to see these guys dance again. 
Support Flex is Kings on Kickstarter and help them finish shooting, editing and with post-production on this film! Above are some iphone snaps from last night’s event. At the 3 minute mark of Chapter 11 of Girl Walk, you see a young man start to glide his way across a crosswalk in Chinatown. He’s one of five Flex dancers we had the good fortune to film dancing on a glorious afternoon on our final day of shooting last October. Flexing is a relatively new dance style (born in about the year 2000) full of theatrics, street narrative, incredibly innovative usage of props, humor, collaboration, insane flexibility and strength, and gets its roots from reggae and other Caribbean dance forms. Most, if not all of the dancers we filmed, live in East New York, Brooklyn, and many come from tough neighborhoods where dance is a major outlet for fun, creative expression and keeping them out of trouble. 
Recently, we learned about Flex is Kings, a new documentary being made about these Flexers by filmmakers Diedre Schoo and Mike Nichols. They’ve shot 275 hours of footage of these guys (and occasional gals) dancing, battling, on the streets, at home and all over the city of New York. 
Last night, most of team Girl Walk got to attend a dance demo/battle at the Bond Street Theater, where 15 of Brooklyn’s best Flexers came out to break down what flexing really is, and show off some of the movements and routines that make this style of dance so incredible. We learned about connecting, pausing, bonebreaking, gliding, punchlines and the many components that make up the vocabulary of movement and theater. It was a fabulous night and we can’t wait to see these guys dance again. 
Support Flex is Kings on Kickstarter and help them finish shooting, editing and with post-production on this film! Above are some iphone snaps from last night’s event. At the 3 minute mark of Chapter 11 of Girl Walk, you see a young man start to glide his way across a crosswalk in Chinatown. He’s one of five Flex dancers we had the good fortune to film dancing on a glorious afternoon on our final day of shooting last October. Flexing is a relatively new dance style (born in about the year 2000) full of theatrics, street narrative, incredibly innovative usage of props, humor, collaboration, insane flexibility and strength, and gets its roots from reggae and other Caribbean dance forms. Most, if not all of the dancers we filmed, live in East New York, Brooklyn, and many come from tough neighborhoods where dance is a major outlet for fun, creative expression and keeping them out of trouble. 
Recently, we learned about Flex is Kings, a new documentary being made about these Flexers by filmmakers Diedre Schoo and Mike Nichols. They’ve shot 275 hours of footage of these guys (and occasional gals) dancing, battling, on the streets, at home and all over the city of New York. 
Last night, most of team Girl Walk got to attend a dance demo/battle at the Bond Street Theater, where 15 of Brooklyn’s best Flexers came out to break down what flexing really is, and show off some of the movements and routines that make this style of dance so incredible. We learned about connecting, pausing, bonebreaking, gliding, punchlines and the many components that make up the vocabulary of movement and theater. It was a fabulous night and we can’t wait to see these guys dance again. 
Support Flex is Kings on Kickstarter and help them finish shooting, editing and with post-production on this film! Above are some iphone snaps from last night’s event. At the 3 minute mark of Chapter 11 of Girl Walk, you see a young man start to glide his way across a crosswalk in Chinatown. He’s one of five Flex dancers we had the good fortune to film dancing on a glorious afternoon on our final day of shooting last October. Flexing is a relatively new dance style (born in about the year 2000) full of theatrics, street narrative, incredibly innovative usage of props, humor, collaboration, insane flexibility and strength, and gets its roots from reggae and other Caribbean dance forms. Most, if not all of the dancers we filmed, live in East New York, Brooklyn, and many come from tough neighborhoods where dance is a major outlet for fun, creative expression and keeping them out of trouble. 
Recently, we learned about Flex is Kings, a new documentary being made about these Flexers by filmmakers Diedre Schoo and Mike Nichols. They’ve shot 275 hours of footage of these guys (and occasional gals) dancing, battling, on the streets, at home and all over the city of New York. 
Last night, most of team Girl Walk got to attend a dance demo/battle at the Bond Street Theater, where 15 of Brooklyn’s best Flexers came out to break down what flexing really is, and show off some of the movements and routines that make this style of dance so incredible. We learned about connecting, pausing, bonebreaking, gliding, punchlines and the many components that make up the vocabulary of movement and theater. It was a fabulous night and we can’t wait to see these guys dance again. 
Support Flex is Kings on Kickstarter and help them finish shooting, editing and with post-production on this film! Above are some iphone snaps from last night’s event. 

At the 3 minute mark of Chapter 11 of Girl Walk, you see a young man start to glide his way across a crosswalk in Chinatown. He’s one of five Flex dancers we had the good fortune to film dancing on a glorious afternoon on our final day of shooting last October. Flexing is a relatively new dance style (born in about the year 2000) full of theatrics, street narrative, incredibly innovative usage of props, humor, collaboration, insane flexibility and strength, and gets its roots from reggae and other Caribbean dance forms. Most, if not all of the dancers we filmed, live in East New York, Brooklyn, and many come from tough neighborhoods where dance is a major outlet for fun, creative expression and keeping them out of trouble. 

Recently, we learned about Flex is Kings, a new documentary being made about these Flexers by filmmakers Diedre Schoo and Mike Nichols. They’ve shot 275 hours of footage of these guys (and occasional gals) dancing, battling, on the streets, at home and all over the city of New York. 

Last night, most of team Girl Walk got to attend a dance demo/battle at the Bond Street Theater, where 15 of Brooklyn’s best Flexers came out to break down what flexing really is, and show off some of the movements and routines that make this style of dance so incredible. We learned about connecting, pausing, bonebreaking, gliding, punchlines and the many components that make up the vocabulary of movement and theater. It was a fabulous night and we can’t wait to see these guys dance again. 

Support Flex is Kings on Kickstarter and help them finish shooting, editing and with post-production on this film! Above are some iphone snaps from last night’s event. 

Art in the Era of the Internet from PBS Digital Studios

Featuring:
Yancey Strickler, Co-Founder of Kickstarter
Lawrence Lessig, Co-Founder of Creative Commons
Ciel Hunter, Creative Director of Creators Project
Julia Kaganskiy, Editor of Creators Project

Thinking of making a dance film and want to use Kickstarter for funding? Learn how to make the most of Kickstarter for your dance film. 
Girl Walk // All Day Director Jacob Krupnick will join Kickstarter’s Stephanie Pereira for a discussion on: 
January 28th at 11:00 AM Freida and Furman Gallery in the Walter Reade Theater Free Event – First Come, First Served Presented by the Dance Films Association
[Photo from Pina by Wim Wenders] 

Thinking of making a dance film and want to use Kickstarter for funding? Learn how to make the most of Kickstarter for your dance film. 

Girl Walk // All Day Director Jacob Krupnick will join Kickstarter’s Stephanie Pereira for a discussion on: 

January 28th at 11:00 AM
Freida and Furman Gallery in the Walter Reade Theater
Free Event – First Come, First Served
Presented by the Dance Films Association

[Photo from Pina by Wim Wenders] 

"The success brought about by the Kickstarter-funded Popa shutter button has very little to do with money. “It’s not going to make you rich, no,” he says laughing, barely able to get the words out. The reward is much deeper. “I was with my nephews the other week,” he begins solemnly, “one is six and one is nine-years old. I put it on the phone, the app fires up, and they just ran around the room taking photos. For me it was actually a bit overwhelming and emotional.” Brendan pauses. “Ideas are nothing without execution and becoming real. For me, that’s what Kickstarter facilitates. It’s not about getting rich.” Brendan begins laughing again, “there must be fucking easier ways of making money.”"

— “Kickstarted: How one company is revolutionizing product development” (The Verge)

(Source: yancey)


On Thursday night Kickstarter had the honor of hosting the world premiere of the film Girl Walk // All Day. The premiere wasn’t held in a seated theater for a polite audience. It was held in front of 1,200 dancing and cheering people at a music venue, the Brooklyn Masonic Temple. Many in the audience were backers of the project.
Kickstarter has been intertwined with Girl Walk from its beginning. We watched that Staten Island Ferry video dozens of times, and both myself and Cassie (another Kickstarter-er) appear as dancers in the film (“dancer” in quotes for me). This is not unusual for us. We get emotionally invested in projects everyday — we look at them all — and our team is constantly backing projects. Many on our staff backed Girl Walk.
The crazy thing about Thursday was seeing that same enthusiasm from people that aren’t us. Girl Walk is an incredible film and a future cult classic. But is that enough to get 1,200 people to wait in an around-the-block line to see a movie with no marketing on a cold December night? And off the G train no less? Before the screening I ran into Sasha Frere-Jones from The New Yorker and he was curious about the crowd. “Why are all these people here?” he asked. “Because it’s the internet,” I think I said.
But I don’t think that’s entirely true. I think us 1,200 people lined up to see Girl Walk for the same reasons we back projects on Kickstarter: because it was ours. What made Thursday unique wasn’t just that it was a movie premiere where people danced. Because of how it was made, because of its soundtrack, because it’s a film about not settling for the world as it is, Girl Walk was our movie. 
Shared experiences like those are hard to come by. But everyday, in ways big and small, Kickstarter helps them happen. There aren’t always 1,200 people and throngs of photographers there to see them. There isn’t always a line around the block. But there’s always that huge buzz: “WE DID IT!”

— via Yancey Strickler, co-founder, Kickstarter

On Thursday night Kickstarter had the honor of hosting the world premiere of the film Girl Walk // All Day. The premiere wasn’t held in a seated theater for a polite audience. It was held in front of 1,200 dancing and cheering people at a music venue, the Brooklyn Masonic Temple. Many in the audience were backers of the project.

Kickstarter has been intertwined with Girl Walk from its beginning. We watched that Staten Island Ferry video dozens of times, and both myself and Cassie (another Kickstarter-er) appear as dancers in the film (“dancer” in quotes for me). This is not unusual for us. We get emotionally invested in projects everyday — we look at them all — and our team is constantly backing projects. Many on our staff backed Girl Walk.

The crazy thing about Thursday was seeing that same enthusiasm from people that aren’t us. Girl Walk is an incredible film and a future cult classic. But is that enough to get 1,200 people to wait in an around-the-block line to see a movie with no marketing on a cold December night? And off the G train no less? Before the screening I ran into Sasha Frere-Jones from The New Yorker and he was curious about the crowd. “Why are all these people here?” he asked. “Because it’s the internet,” I think I said.

But I don’t think that’s entirely true. I think us 1,200 people lined up to see Girl Walk for the same reasons we back projects on Kickstarter: because it was ours. What made Thursday unique wasn’t just that it was a movie premiere where people danced. Because of how it was made, because of its soundtrack, because it’s a film about not settling for the world as it is, Girl Walk was our movie. 

Shared experiences like those are hard to come by. But everyday, in ways big and small, Kickstarter helps them happen. There aren’t always 1,200 people and throngs of photographers there to see them. There isn’t always a line around the block. But there’s always that huge buzz: “WE DID IT!

via Yancey Strickler, co-founder, Kickstarter