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Tonight! Girl Walk // All Day Minneapolis Premiere: Screening + Dance Party w/live performances by Arena Dances and guest DJs. Presented by First Avenue + Sound Unseen. 
Friday, June 15th at First Avenue MainroomDoors: 8:00 p.m. / Screening: 9:00 p.m. Ages 18+ with a valid photo ID701 First Avenue NorthMinneapolis, MN 55403
Get Tickets ($8 adv / $10 at the door) 
Also: Hear an interview Director Jacob Krupnick did this morning with Minnesota Public Radio’s The Current about tonight’s event! 

Tonight! Girl Walk // All Day Minneapolis Premiere: Screening + Dance Party w/live performances by Arena Dances and guest DJs. Presented by First Avenue + Sound Unseen. 

Friday, June 15th at First Avenue Mainroom
Doors: 8:00 p.m. / Screening: 9:00 p.m. 
Ages 18+ with a valid photo ID
701 First Avenue North
Minneapolis, MN 55403

Get Tickets ($8 adv / $10 at the door) 

Also: Hear an interview Director Jacob Krupnick did this morning with Minnesota Public Radio’s The Current about tonight’s event! 


Anne Marsen speaks with Anjie Pontani of The Pontani Pages about the making-of Girl Walk.

thepontanipages:

Anne Marsen found instant notoriety as the star of “Girl Walk//All Day,” a 71-minute music video for Girl Talk’s “All Day” album. The film/video features Anne as a frustrated dancer who leaves behind the prim and proper world of pirouettes for a day spent spinning, hopping, skipping and tapping all over New York City. Most of the incredible dancing in the film was improvised by Anne, her very talented co-stars, and many accidental pedestrians turned performers in this paean to New York, music and the spirit of movement. In this edition of the Pontani Pages podcast, hostess and fellow hybrid-style dancer (ahem) Angie Pontani talks shop, and talks Walk, with Anne.

We’ve had a lot of interviews over the last 15 months, but yesterday’s 45 minute conversation between Director Jacob Krupnick and CNET’s Daniel Terdiman was the first to take the gchat format. 
Krupnick and Terdiman discuss the making of the film, at length, whether Krupnick thought the film “would work,” the role of Kickstarter, advice for filmmakers headed down the Kickstarter route, and why we released the film online in chapters. 
A few excerpts are below, and head over to CNET to read the full article.
We live in a world with $100 million action films with massively expensive special effects. How does a small film like yours end up being so intriguing? 

Krupnick: I have a pretty strong aversion to heavy-duty special effects work, actually. I’m just not a fan of fakeness. With “Girl Walk,” there are a bunch of layers of reality. As the viewer, you know it really happened. You know the dancers performed their routine; they’re not marionettes.
We wanted to create a film that would be constantly engaging, and totally immersive, so that you’d feel like you were on a custom roller coaster, swimming through the city in pursuit of these wily, unpredictable dancers.
…
What does your success story say about the future of funding small independent films? 
…
Krupnick: What gives me pause as a creator is whether I could produce something that requires less crowd-calling. I’ve embraced every aspect of the crowd with this film, but I worry that projects might wind up spending too much energy on campaigning. That worked wonderfully for our project, but isn’t necessarily the ticket for quieter projects. The lesson for an independent filmmaker is that money is just half the battle. Arguably, the bigger one is finding your audience. Kickstarter helped get us both of these.

We’ve had a lot of interviews over the last 15 months, but yesterday’s 45 minute conversation between Director Jacob Krupnick and CNET’s Daniel Terdiman was the first to take the gchat format. 

Krupnick and Terdiman discuss the making of the film, at length, whether Krupnick thought the film “would work,” the role of Kickstarter, advice for filmmakers headed down the Kickstarter route, and why we released the film online in chapters. 

A few excerpts are below, and head over to CNET to read the full article.

We live in a world with $100 million action films with massively expensive special effects. How does a small film like yours end up being so intriguing? 

Krupnick: I have a pretty strong aversion to heavy-duty special effects work, actually. I’m just not a fan of fakeness. With “Girl Walk,” there are a bunch of layers of reality. As the viewer, you know it really happened. You know the dancers performed their routine; they’re not marionettes.

We wanted to create a film that would be constantly engaging, and totally immersive, so that you’d feel like you were on a custom roller coaster, swimming through the city in pursuit of these wily, unpredictable dancers.

What does your success story say about the future of funding small independent films? 

Krupnick: What gives me pause as a creator is whether I could produce something that requires less crowd-calling. I’ve embraced every aspect of the crowd with this film, but I worry that projects might wind up spending too much energy on campaigning. That worked wonderfully for our project, but isn’t necessarily the ticket for quieter projects. The lesson for an independent filmmaker is that money is just half the battle. Arguably, the bigger one is finding your audience. Kickstarter helped get us both of these.

Director Jacob Krupnick speaks to MOFILM/Chevrolet about Girl Walk // All Day at SXSW. 

Amy Holtan interviews John Doyle, aka The Creep, about the name of his character, influences on his dancing, how he moves like a skeleton, and the three words that define his dance style. 

Amy Holtan interviews John Doyle, aka The Creep, about the name of his character, influences on his dancing, how he moves like a skeleton, and the three words that define his dance style. 

A Q&A with Jacob Krupnick by Julie Bloom at the New York Times

A Q&A with Jacob Krupnick by Julie Bloom at the New York Times

Check out Jacob’s interview with Cindy Hsu on the CBS Morning Show!

Think Quarterly, Google’s new online magazine, has a fantastic feature about Yancey Strickler and Kickstarter in their recently released Innovation issue. 

When asked what the key to succeeding on Kickstarter is, Strickler is emphatic: “It’s not a marketing plan, it’s not a branding layout of what it is that they’re making; it’s a story of them, a story of the individual coming to this thing and why they’re trying to make this thing happen and what that quest is and what the goal is,” he explains… 

We at Girl Walk like to see ourselves as a few of those individuals with an idea, an idea that became a story, and a story that has been enormously empowered to come to life because of what Yancey + Perry have created.

Think Quarterly, Google’s new online magazine, has a fantastic feature about Yancey Strickler and Kickstarter in their recently released Innovation issue

When asked what the key to succeeding on Kickstarter is, Strickler is emphatic: “It’s not a marketing plan, it’s not a branding layout of what it is that they’re making; it’s a story of them, a story of the individual coming to this thing and why they’re trying to make this thing happen and what that quest is and what the goal is,” he explains… 

We at Girl Walk like to see ourselves as a few of those individuals with an idea, an idea that became a story, and a story that has been enormously empowered to come to life because of what Yancey + Perry have created.

Jacob talked to Gothamist about the Girl Walk team’s many filming adventures, plans for the film’s premiere + how Kickstarter has changed his life.
Also, he reiterates the driving line of thought behind the whole project: 

I’m more interested in the way dance is an expression of an ecstatic, ineffable feeling than I am in the perfect expression of movements by trained dancers. I hope that Girl Walk inspires people to move with less self-consciousness and more freedom.

Read the full  interview with Jacob over at Gothamist. 

Jacob talked to Gothamist about the Girl Walk team’s many filming adventures, plans for the film’s premiere + how Kickstarter has changed his life.

Also, he reiterates the driving line of thought behind the whole project: 

I’m more interested in the way dance is an expression of an ecstatic, ineffable feeling than I am in the perfect expression of movements by trained dancers. I hope that Girl Walk inspires people to move with less self-consciousness and more freedom.

Read the full  interview with Jacob over at Gothamist

The crew at revolution.is interviewed Jacob about the winding path that brought him to Girl Walk. Read the full piece over on their site, which has an inspiring collection of stories about people whose work is their passion. 

The crew at revolution.is interviewed Jacob about the winding path that brought him to Girl Walk. Read the full piece over on their site, which has an inspiring collection of stories about people whose work is their passion.